Grant for Maud Plantinga

Comment

Grant for Maud Plantinga

Beginning of April, Maud Plantinga was granted for funding from the Wilhelmina Kinder Ziekenhuis (WKZ, Wilhemina Childrens Hospital) for her work on Dendritic Cell therapy. The next two years she will uncover the different DC subtypes and their functional specialization using single cell RNA sequence, to further optimize immunotherapeutic strategies with DC to treat (pediatric) patients.

Comment

Research grant from Lymph&Co

Research grant from Lymph&Co

Research grant from Lymph&Co for collaboration drs Marianne Boes (LTI-WKZ), Friederike Meyer-Wentrup (PMC) and Victor Peperzak (Tumor Immunology, LTI).

The grant was handed out by Prince Bernhard van Oranje at the ‘Hollandse 100’ event in Heereveen.

In the next 4 years this research team aims to target V-D-J recombined B-cell receptors as neoantigens for lymphoma immunotherapy.

 

Links:

https://www.dehollandse100.nl/

https://www.dehollandse100.nl/evenement/de-familie-groeps-estafette/updates/3240-breaking-bestuur-lymph-co-adopteert-nieuw-baanbrekend-onderzoek-naar-vaccins-voor-lymfklierkanker-bij-volwassenen-en-kinderen?locale=nl

Publication In Nature Medicine Leusen group

Comment

Publication In Nature Medicine Leusen group

New strategy to tackle 'don't eat me' signal on cancer cells

Myeloid immune cells kill cancer cells by eating them but cancer cells prevent this from happening by giving out a 'do not eat me' signal. In a collaborative effort, the Netherlands Cancer Institute, Oncode, Leiden University Medical Center and University Medical Center Utrecht have discovered a new method to inhibit the 'don't eat me' signal, and have therefore found a new strategy for immunotherapy.

On 4 March 2019, the researchers published an article on this topic in the scientific journal Nature Medicine.

 The "don't eat me" signal

Different types of immune cells have different strategies to fight cancer cells. For example, some immune cells—myeloid cells—kill cancer cells by eating them. Cancer cells can prevent this by expressing proteins on their surfaces which give out inhibiting signals to the immune cells. One example is the CD47 molecule that provides a 'don't eat me' signal, which enables the cancer cell to survive.

Researchers around the world are looking for medicines to block this "don't eat me" signal. One method for doing so is to intervene on the surface of the cell, by covering the CD47 molecules on cancer cells with a specific antibody. (see for example Advani et al, N Engl J Med. 2018 379:1711, and Valerius, Rösner and Leusen, N Egl J Med, 2019, 380:496)

This method of blocking the CD47 signal from cancer cells is currently being clinically developed and is promising, but there are side effects, such as a decrease in red blood cells. On top of that, patients require a weekly IV to block the CD47 molecules on cancer cells adequately.

 Screening the CD47 molecule

To search for new strategies to block CD47, Meike Logtenberg, first author on the paper worked with Thijn Brummelkamp to genetically screen CD47 and found one hit: QPCTL. This enzyme is crucial in forming the "don't eat me" signal, because it alters the CD47 protein.

Ton Schumacher: "In collaboration with the groups of Jeanette Leusen (UMC Utrecht) and Timo van den Berg (Sanquin Research), we then showed that as soon as we inhibited the activity of this enzyme, we instantly blocked the "don't eat me" signal on tumor cells’. In preclinical models, performed by Marco Jansen in the group of Jeanette Leusen, it became evident that cancer cells could only be killed with an antibody, when the enzyme was removed.

 Advantages for therapy

Inhibitors of QPCTL can be given to patients as pills, whereas antibodies need to be given as intravenous infections. With these inhibitors, it is also easier to control the duration of the effect. Moreover, they do not inhibit the CD47 molecules on the healthy red blood cells that a patient receives during a blood transfusion to fight anemia.

 Clinical studies

The researchers expect that QPCTL inhibitors will be available for testing in clinical studies in the coming years. First clinical trials are expected to take place in patients with blood cancer.

Meike E. W. Logtenberg et al. Glutaminyl cyclase is an enzymatic modifier of the CD47- SIRPα axis and a target for cancer immunotherapy, Nature Medicine (2019). DOI: 10.1038/s41591-019-0356-z

Funding: This research was financed by the European Research Council, the LUMC, the McDowell Cancer Foundation and the Dutch Cancer Society (KWF)(UMCU).

Comment

EBMT receives a regulatory qualification from the European Medicine Agency (EMA) on the use of its patient registry to support novel CAR T-cell therapies.

EBMT receives a regulatory qualification from the European Medicine Agency (EMA) on the use of its patient registry to support novel CAR T-cell therapies.

As a result of extensive interaction with the EMA that started in late 2016 when the EBMT responded to the EMA’s Patient Registry Initiative, the EBMT registry has been qualified as a suitable platform for the collection of data for post-authorisation safety surveillance (PASS) and efficacy studies. The registry is now considered suitable to perform pharmacoepidemiological studies for regulatory purposes, concerning Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy used in the treatment of haematological malignancies.

Jürgen Kuball, EBMT treasurer and liaison with the EMA, says: “The EBMT is proud that EMA formally recognises the value of our registry. This recognition will lead to an improved communication across the various stakeholders, including registry owners, regulators and marketing authorisation holders, giving confidence to users on the data collected and ultimately bring safe and effective therapies to our patients”.

Read the full press release here

4 KWF grants for Tumor Immunology of the LTI!

Comment

4 KWF grants for Tumor Immunology of the LTI!


Last week we received significant funding from the Dutch Cancer Society (KWF) for our work on leukemia, lymphoma and neuroblastoma.


2 project grants:
- Jürgen Kuball, Zsolt Sebestyen and Dennis Beringer received 650 keuro for the use of gdTCR anti CD3 bispecific molecules (GABs) for AML

- Jeanette Leusen received 550 keuro for the use of IgA as new isotype for the treatment of lymphoma and neuroblastoma, in combination with innate checkpoint inhibition


2 high-risk from Alpe d'HuZes:
- Stefan Nierkens together with Femke van Wijk and Jaap Jan Boelens received 187 keuro for the development of a new method for T cell therapy of recidial, pediatric leukemia

- Niels Bovenschen together with Wim Hennink received 150 keuro for nano medication mimicking effector immune response.

Together this is over 1.5 million euro's funding to support our research against cancer.

Comment

KWF grant voor Stefan Nierkens

Comment

KWF grant voor Stefan Nierkens

Het KWF heeft immunoloog Stefan Nierkens een bijdrage toegekend voor de ontwikkeling van een therapie om de overleving van kinderen met acute myeloide leukemie (AML) te verbeteren.

Kinderen met AML die slecht reageren op de eerste behandeling worden doorgaans behandeld met een hematopoietische donor-stamceltransplantatie (HCT). Ondanks deze in opzet curatieve behandeling keert de kanker terug bij meer dan een derde van de getransplanteerde patiënten, wat zorgt voor een slechte prognose. Het toedienen van afweercellen die getraind zijn om de kankercellen te herkennen en te vernietigen heeft grote potentie om kanker te genezen. De afweercellen kunnen bij kinderen na de transplantatie gegeven worden om te voorkomen dat de leukemie terugkomt. 

In het door KWF toegekende onderzoek gebruiken de onderzoekers de stamcellen van een deel van het transplantaat dat de patiënten krijgen bij de HCT. Dit zijn vaak cellen uit navelstrengbloed. De onderzoekers gaan uitzoeken hoe ze in het laboratorium de cellen in grote getale kunnen opgroeien en genetisch bewerken, zodat ze de kanker kunnen herkennen, en zo mogelijk als nieuwe immuuntherapie na transplantatie gebruikt kunnen worden. Het project komt voort uit het werk van promovendus C. De Koning en is een samenwerking met F. van Wijk en J. Boelens.

Comment

Interview Prof Kuball for Utrecht Life Sciences

Comment

Interview Prof Kuball for Utrecht Life Sciences

Fighting cancer with our immune system

You can read the complete interview here:

Fighting cancer with our immune system

As a blood cancer doctor, I see many cancer patients who do not respond well to treatment or who suffer from serious side effects when treated with currently available therapies. These shortcomings inspire me since many years to continuously develop novel therapies for our patients. In Utrecht, I’m able to combine the pragmatic approach of “how do we treat patients from day to day” with “how can we create superior therapeutic interventions”. To do so, we need to better understand on a molecular level treatment mechanism of currently used interventions, as well as to build on our daily shortcomings a better science for improved therapies.

Traditionally, cancer is thought of as a disease of the genome, caused by defects or mutations in our DNA that make cells grow out of control. Because cancer is really a constellation of diseases and because each patient responds differently to treatment, designing effective and broadly-applicable cancer drugs is difficult. Yet, with new insights into the biology of cancer, promising new approaches are on the horizon. A telling example is recent research aimed at boosting our immune system in response to cancer. We can now engineer immune cells to recognize specific changes on cancer cells.  

Detecting cancer as metabolic disease? 

From a therapeutic point of view, this may be a good thing, because metabolic changes in a cell occur very early in cancer and don’t seem to be dependent on the genetic changes that are typical for tumor cells. Even at this early stage, the immune system can detect metabolic changes in cancer cells that have very few genetic abnormalities. My group has identified and characterized a new sensor that is instrumental in this process. This sensor is a gamma delta T-cell receptor (γδ TCR) that scouts for altered lipid metabolism in cancer cells. Unfortunately, the replication capacity of the immune cells that carry this sensor is low, making it difficult to generate adequate amounts for therapy or resulting in a quick elimination of cells once stimulated or transferred in human.

Engineering a new type of immune cell

To overcome physiological weaknesses of γδT cells, but also to use their powerful tumor-sensing receptors, we uncovered how this receptor recognizes cancer and also developed strategies to overcome the major weaknesses of γδ T cells in advanced cancer patients, such as the inability to rapidly expand and kill tumors. We’ve taken another type of T cell - the alpha beta T cell (αβT cell), which has good proliferation capacity but lacks appropriate tumor reactivity - and engineered a well-defined γδT-cell receptor with strong anti-cancer reactivity onto it. This new type of cell, so called “TEGs”, combines the strengths of both original cell types: it has the ability to specifically recognize malignant transformation of a cell; it has the ability to proliferate well; and even more importantly, it can effectively target a broad range of tumor cells. In 2015, we established the UMCU-spinoff company GADETA, based on this innovative immunotherapy and will soon conduct a phase I clinical trial in advanced cancer patients.

Exploring this novel type of receptor is just the tip of the iceberg. Because utilizing the γδ TCR mode of recognition for cancer detecting is so novel, many other subtypes may also be of value in the near future. This is where the Molecular Immunology Hub comes into play and connecting diverse parties together will ensure our strong position in this emerging field of immunotherapy.

The hub will bring our science to patients

The Molecular Immunology Hub is a bridging platform that can mitigate many risks of early drug developments. Within our academic environment, we can bring a new asset (potential therapeutic candidate) to a certain stage until the new compound is well enough defined to be considered lower risk for a biotech or pharma company for a more advanced clinical development.  One example is the need to fully characterize other subtypes of γδ TCR, both molecularly and structurally, so that we can understand what these receptors recognize and bind to, how they bind and how they function.

The University Medical Center Utrecht and Utrecht University have a treasure of excellent scientists who are working on these fundamental scientific questions in complementary areas of expertise. Both organizations are located at the Utrecht Science Park, which encompasses numerous startups and industry partners. This is fertile ground inspiration and innovation, and the hub is gathering together previously loose connections and solidifying them.

Through the hub, we expect that we’ll be able move γδ TCR science forward quickly into translational application, thereby supporting early and late stage development of clinical compounds, which will create new funding sources and stronger connections with biotech and pharmaceutical industry. Together, we hope that we can co-develop our technologies and inventions so that we can target more specifically broader patient populations and translate these findings into daily clinical practice.

Comment

Publication in Science Signaling for group Leusen

Comment

Publication in Science Signaling for group Leusen

Mechanisms of inside-out signaling of the high-affinity IgG receptor FcγRI by
Arianne M. Brandsma,, Samantha L. Schwartz,  Michael J. Wester, Christopher C. Valley,  Gittan L. A. Blezer, Gestur Vidarsson,  Keith A. Lidke, Toine ten Broeke, Diane S. Lidke and Jeanette H. W. Leusen was published in Science Signaling last week.

Summary: http://stke.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/summary/sigtrans;11/540/eaaq0891?ijkey=mCNXTir8S2fxc&keytype=ref&siteid=sigtrans

Abstract: http://stke.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/abstract/sigtrans;11/540/eaaq0891?ijkey=mCNXTir8S2fxc&keytype=ref&siteid=sigtrans

Reprint: http://stke.sciencemag.org/cgi/reprint/sigtrans;11/540/eaaq0891?ijkey=mCNXTir8S2fxc&keytype=ref&siteid=sigtrans

Full text: http://stke.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/sigtrans;11/540/eaaq0891?ijkey=mCNXTir8S2fxc&keytype=ref&siteid=sigtrans

 

Comment

Interview Jurgen Kuball EBMT tv

Comment

Interview Jurgen Kuball EBMT tv

Jürgen Kuball,  discusses European institutions working towards the accelerated development of cellular therapies to tackle cancer and other debilitating disorders of the hematopoietic system and the work of the EBMT Registry. Watch the interview here

Comment

Interview PA Denise Buter in tijdschrift hematologie-oncologie

Comment

Interview PA Denise Buter in tijdschrift hematologie-oncologie

‘Als phycisian assistant kun je voor een groot deel zelf je takenpakket ontwikkelen’

 

Denise Buter, phycisian assistant op de afdeling hematologie van UMC Utrecht, heeft drie maanden per jaar een zaalartsfunctie en is de andere negen maanden actief als consulent op de hematologische dagbehandeling. Een functie die ze grotendeels zelf gecreëerd heeft en die naar haar mening duidelijke meerwaarde heeft voor de patiënten én de artsen.

‘Als phycisian assistant word je breed opgeleid, de kennis over je specialisme haal je uit je werkplek’

klik hier voor het artikel

Comment

Promovendus Jurgen Langenhorst wint prestigieuze prijs

Comment

Promovendus Jurgen Langenhorst wint prestigieuze prijs

Jurgen Langenhorst, promovendus in de Nierkens/Boelens groep, heeft op 31 mei tijdens de 27e Meeting of the Population Approach Group Europe (PAGE) in Montreux de prestigieuze Lewis Sheiner Student Award gewonnen. Deze prijs wordt elk jaar uitgereikt aan drie studenten die het beste abstract hebben ingediend voor deze bijeenkomst. Jurgen heeft een presentatie gehouden over zijn onderzoek naar de relatie tussen blootstelling aan het middel fludarabine en overleving na een stamceltransplantatie.
 

Over de prijs
Het is het grootste farmacometrie congres in Europa: de PAGE-meeting. Farmacometrie is een vakgebied, waar wiskundige modellen worden gebruikt om geneesmiddel-effect te kwantificeren: van dosis, naar bloedspiegels, naar effect. Voor deze PAGE-meetings, worden elk jaar PhD-studenten uitgedaagd hun onderzoek in te sturen voor de Lewis Sheiner student session, genoemd naar de grondlegger van de methodiek achter farmacometrie. Van alle inzendingen wordt uiteindelijk aan 3 tot 4 studenten de prijs toegekend. Dit betekent dat zij naast het ontvangen van de prijs, ook extra tijd krijgen hun onderzoek te presenteren op het congres zelf.

Over het onderzoek
Het onderzoek dat geselecteerd is voor deze sessie, betreft het middel fludarabine. Dit is een middel dat gebruikt wordt in de voorbereidende behandeling voor een stamceltransplantatie: een laatste behandeling voor leukemie of levensbedreigende benigne hematologische aandoeningen. Fludarabine wordt gegeven om het immuunsysteem van de patiënt te onderdrukken om de kans op aanslaan van het transplantaat te maximaliseren en afstoting te voorkomen. In een eerder stadium hebben we gevonden dat de blootstelling in het bloed erg variabel is met de huidige dosering. Daarbij zagen we dat de lage blootstellingen geassocieerd waren met afstoting van het transplantaat en hoge blootstellingen met een tragere opbouw van het nieuwe immuunsysteem en daaropvolgend een sterk verhoogde kans op overlijden. Omdat dit retrospectief onderzoek betreft, blijft er altijd onzekerheid en is nog niet zeker of andere doseringen gericht op de optimale blootstelling inderdaad de overleving zullen verbeteren. Het prijswinnende onderzoek betreft simulaties van verschillende opzetten van prospectieve gerandomiseerde studies, waarbij de huidige dosis vergeleken wordt met de bloostelling gerichte dosering. Op deze manier konden we uitrekenen hoeveel patiënten er nodig zijn om te bewijzen of andere doseringen tot een verbeterde overleving leiden. Dusdanig kan een studie opgezet worden, waarbij zo min mogelijk patiënten nodig zijn, zonder in te boeten op het vermogen een effect aan te tonen.

 

Comment

Publication award Coco de Koning bij het I&I symposium

Comment

Publication award Coco de Koning bij het I&I symposium

Tijdens het recente I&I symposium op 12 juni jl werd een nieuwe jaarlijks terugkerende prijs uitgereikt, de PhD publication award, ter waarde van een bedrag van 700 euro vrij te besteden. De award is dit jaar gewonnen door Coco de Koning, werkzaam in de Boelens-Nierkens groep,  voor haar publicatie in het tijdschrift Blood Advances. Hierin beschrijft ze waarom het herstel van het immuunsysteem na een stamceltransplantatie, wat van groot belang is voor het succes van deze behandeling, bij sommige kinderen sterk is vertraagd. Zij vond dat er bij deze patiëntjes na transplantatie een onbedoelde gezamenlijke blootstelling van twee standaard medicijnen ontstaat (ATG en Filgrastim), die toxisch is voor de herstellende immuuncellen. Deze bevinding biedt inzicht om de standaardbehandeling eenvoudig aan te passen, om zo het succes van stamceltransplantaties bij kinderen in de toekomst te verbeteren.

Comment

Maud Plantinga, onderzoeker van de week bij KWF

Comment

Maud Plantinga, onderzoeker van de week bij KWF

Tegenwoordig geneest 4 op de 5 kinderen met kanker. De genezingskans hangt wel sterk af van het type tumor. Zo zijn er leukemiesoorten die de neiging hebben om na de behandeling terug te komen. Als dat gebeurt, is de overlevingskans veel kleiner. Onderzoekers zijn dag en nacht bezig om de kansen voor deze patiëntjes te verbeteren. Zo ook dr. Maud Plantinga. In het UMC Utrecht ontwerpt ze een vaccin dat de kans op terugkeer van leukemie bij kinderen verkleint.
Klik hier voor het artikel

 

 

 

 

Comment

Kirsten Geneugelijk ontvangt Jon J. Rood Prijs

Comment

Kirsten Geneugelijk ontvangt Jon J. Rood Prijs

Postdoctoraal onderzoeker dr. Kirsten Geneugelijk van het Laboratorium voor Translationele Immunologie (LTI) heeft recent op het zogenaamde Bootcongres van de Nederlandse Transplantatievereniging de Jon. J. van Rood prijs ontvangen. Deze prestigieuze prijs wordt één keer per twee jaar toegekend aan de auteur van het beste proefschrift op transplantatiegebied (basale wetenschap).

Kirsten promoveerde op 27 Juni 2017 op het proefschrift “Indirect recognition of HLA epitopes in solid organ transplantation” onder promotor prof. Erik Hack en copromotor dr. Eric Spierings (beiden LTI).

De prijs werd uitgereikt door emeritus hoogleraar Frans Claas (LUMC). In het jury rapport benadrukte hij het belang van dit proefschrift, omdat Kirsten hierin voor het eerst op brede en structurele wijze het belang van T-cel epitopen in de vorming van HLA-specifieke antistoffen na transplantatie heeft onderzocht. De meest schadelijke antistoffen worden namelijk geproduceerd door B-cellen die hulp hebben kregen van T-cellen. In het proefschrift heeft Kirsten meer inzicht verschaft in welke T-cel epitopen hiervoor van belang zijn.

javascript:noop();

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comment

Jaap Steenbergen  Stipendium for Rick Admiraal

Comment

Jaap Steenbergen Stipendium for Rick Admiraal

On the 25th of January, the Dutch Hematology society (NVvH) has awarded Rick Admiraal (groep Boelens/Nierkens) with the Jaap Steenbergen Stipendium. This award for the best thesis was presented at the Dutch Hematology Congress 2018, held in Papendal. Following a laudation by Monique Minnema, board member of the NVvH, he gave a short presentation on his work on individualised dosing of anti-thymocyte globulin in allogeneic cell transplantation. Last year, he also won the Dutch Society of Pediatrics (NVK) Young Investigator Award for best thesis of 2017, and the award for best thesis of 2017 by the Dutch Society of Pediatrics (NVK) section of immunology and infectious diseases.

 

Comment

KWF grant for Zsolt Sebestyen and Jurgen Kuball

Comment

KWF grant for Zsolt Sebestyen and Jurgen Kuball

KWF grant for Zsolt Sebestyen (PI), Jurgen Kuball and Trudy Straetemans (co-PI's). Congrats!

Abstract: Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remains largely unresponsive to classical immunotherapeutic interventions other than allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Within this context, the major challenge remains the very low mutational load of AML when compared to other diseases, which makes AML initially appear to be less suitable for currently available immune therapies.

The concept of TEGs (abT cell engineered to express a defined gdTCR) provides a promising treatment option for many patients suffering from cancer with low mutational load such as AML, by targeting the RhoB-CD277 axis. Due to this project we aim a more precise molecular understanding of AML targeting by TEGs, which will allow for improved identification of patients who would benefit from this type of immune therapy. In addition while the first human clinical trials with this concept have been initiated, this project will help to understand how efficacy and toxicity of TEGs are balanced, as well as how mechanisms of tolerance active against these most optimized engineered immune cells can be overcome to improve overall efficacy.

 

Comment

Immunologen UMC Utrecht drievoudig in de prijzen

Immunologen UMC Utrecht drievoudig in de prijzen

Immunologen van het Laboratorium voor Translationele Immunologie (LTI) van het UMC Utrecht zijn drie keer in de prijzen gevallen op het congres van de Nederlandse Vereniging voor Immunologie (NVVI) dat deze maand in Noordwijkerhout werd gehouden.

De prijswinnaars:
• Arianne Brandsma, uit de onderzoeksgroep van Jeanette Leusen, kreeg de eerste prijs voor haar posterpresentatie over de betekenis van genetische veranderingen in receptoren voor antistoffen.

• De onderzoeksgroep van Eric Spierings, medisch immunoloog in het LTI, won de prijs voor het beste medisch-immunologisch onderzoek met de presentatie over een nieuw classificatiesysteem dat een betere uitkomst van transplantaties kan voorspellen.

• Matevz Rumpret, uit de onderzoeksgroep van Linde Meyaard, won de Bright Sparks Award voor jong wetenschappelijk talent met zijn presentatie over bacterie-immuun cel interacties.

Met deze oogst haalden de Utrechtse immunologen alle drie beschikbare prijzen voor presentaties binnen op het belangrijkste nationale immunologiecongres dat jaarlijks door meer dan 500 Nederlandse immunologen en onderzoekers wordt bezocht.

KWF project grant for research group Victor Peperzak

KWF project grant for research group Victor Peperzak

Principal investigator Victor Peperzak, together with hematologists Monique Minnema and Margot Jak, received over half a million euro’s from the Dutch Cancer Foundation (KWF) for a project entitled ‘Personalized strategy to avert drug resistance in hematologic cancers’.

The number of anti-cancer drugs that are approved for use in the clinic is enormous and rapidly increasing, but drug resistance and relapse after treatment is still a very common problem. A logical solution is to combine drugs in the treatment of these cancers. However, with the increase in approved drugs, the number of possible combinations are too high to be tested in clinical trials. What is needed is a strategy that allows finding logical combinations of drugs that have a synergistic effect on malignant cells, thereby reducing the chance of cancer relapse. The main goal of the proposed research is to deploy such a strategy with primary patient cells in a physiological setting. I aim to identify logical combinations of existing drugs to improve treatment of hematologic cancers. More specifically, in this project I will focus on the hematologic cancers multiple myeloma (MM), Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia (WM) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) that are currently incurable.

Villa Joep! finances new research for improved Immunotherapy of neuroblastoma

Villa Joep! finances new research for improved Immunotherapy of neuroblastoma

The Immunotherapy group of Dr. Leusen received almost 650.000 euro to do research for improvement of antibody therapy for children with high risk neuroblastom. The contract was recently signed by Dr Leusen and Jos Huijbregts, chair of the board of Villa Joep! 

Approximately 12% of all pediatric cancer patients succumb to neuroblastoma, the most common extracranial solid tumor of childhood. The majority of patients is diagnosed with high-risk neuroblastoma with a mortality of 50%. Neuroblastoma therapy consists of intensive multimodality treatment with severe toxicities. Recurrence rates are high with limited further treatment options. Intensification of conventional therapy has not improved outcome and is even associated with increased toxicity.

In 2015 the antibody dinutuximab (trade name Unituxin), directed against ganglioside GD2, a carbohydrate antigen uniformly expressed on neuroblastoma and neural tissue, was FDA-approved for neuroblastoma treatment. Dinutuximab significantly improved event-free survival in comparison to standard treatment. However, this antibody also causes severe toxicity manifested as spontaneous intense visceral pain and perceived pain in response to light touch (allodynia), evoked by an off-target effect on peripheral nerve fibers.

Within the Immunotherapy group we have generated an improved version of dinutuximab, that will not give these side effects. But also, together with the LTI facility UMAB, we will generate novel antibodies to fight this devastating disease.

Villa Joep! was founded in 2004, to raise money for neuroblastoma research. Joep’s parents founded Villa Joep after losing their little boy at the age of 4.5. This fund has since then turned into a national movement and funding model which is rapidly expanding.

 For more information see www.villajoep.nl